Posts tagged ‘Walt Trizna’

WRITERS CROSSING THE LINE

While attending a dinner with a friend, his wife said, “Glad you have a hobby like writing.”  My then-wife saw me bristle and understood why.  This incident occurred some time ago but not forgotten.

At the time of this event I had already been published and aware of the agony associated on being a writer on the quest to being an author.  I have pondered the issues of writing and differences of the title as writer as a hobby or writer as a profession and arrived at the following conclusion.

My thoughts are these.  As I went for putting words on paper to attempting publication,  I felt writing could no longer be deemed a hobby after experiencing the rejections, multiple times of my work.  After some thought, I realized writing can be a pleasant pastime; that some write for the sheer joy of the experience.   Never seeking publication, only enjoying the mind wandering to places they would never have considered.  Simply enjoying the process of creativity. 

Writing is a hobby until you decide to publish.  It is then you crossed the Rubicon.  There is no going back.  You crossed the line from hobby to profession, and God help you.  For unless you are extremely talented, a writing gem hidden from the world, you will most likely experience rejection.  The words you consider magnificence will push upon the brick wall of reality.

But if you goal is to become an author you will experience a level of doubt and rejection you never anticipated.  But someday, if you carry on, your work will find a home and you are on the road of being an author.  The difference between writer and author is perseverance.

You made it!

You’re an author now and the years of writing as a hobby are behind you.

    

July 12, 2016 at 9:57 pm Leave a comment

POEMS & FLEETING THOUGHTS: AS DARKNESS RUSHES IN

As darkness rushes in

Thoughts are revealed,

Born of solitude life,

Thoughts better born

To exist

In the dark.

April 26, 2016 at 8:40 pm Leave a comment

POEMS & FLEETING THOUGHTS: WINDOWS’ VIEW, PAST AND PRESENT

 

I was born and raised in Newark, New Jersey, a city not known for its beauty or soft heart.  Not my choice, but it helped to form what I am.  These words are meant to describe the difference between my life then and now. 

After all these years I still ponder my life in Newark, and appreciate the emotions and experiences the city provided.

 

As I sit, advanced in age

Looking out back from my home

I see a multitude of trees

Denying the presence of neighbors,

 

I recall the home of my youth

And the views I saw then,

Beer factories

And the back windows

Filled with clothes lines

And hard-packed ground,

Beyond the bordering fence of wood,

More of the same.

 

I now pray

Not to take for granted

This present life,

And not to forget

The past.

April 6, 2016 at 5:14 pm 1 comment

POEMS AND FLEETING THOUGHTS

Progression

 

As my years gain numbers

My once youthful mind

Cannot comprehend

This change,

Ponders

The fading past

And wonders

At the future,

I sometimes feel

Like Kafka’s

Roach,

I went to sleep

At seventeen

And awoke

Nearly seventy,

Trying to grasp

The thoughts

Hopes and dreams

As they drift away,

How will time

Treat my questioning

Soul?

 

 

March 20, 2016 at 9:39 pm 1 comment

PORTRAIT OF JENNIE: A HAUNTING ROMANCE

As promised with my piece about The War of the Worlds, a romance would follow.

Here it is and I hope you pursue this haunting story.

The movie follows a starving artist, played by Joseph Cotton, during the Depression struggling to survive in New York.  An art dealer, played by Ethyl Barrymore, recognizes that he has talented and buys some of his paintings.  Then he meets Jennie, played by Jennifer Jones.  The book, written by Robert Nathan in 1940 and made into the movie, Portrait of Jennie, in 1948 is well worth viewing.  Nathan also wrote The Bishop’s Wife in 1928, made into a movie twice, beginning in 1947.

Now back to Jennie.

This has to be one of the most hauntingly beautiful movies ever made.  When Jennie is a child she and the artist first meet.  As the story progresses, Jennie rapidly matures.  Finally the artist paints her and that portrait becomes the highpoint of his career.  Jennie and the artist become an eternal love.  Jennie is the most haunting character I have ever seen.  Please watch this movie, sometime offered on TCM, if you have a chance.

During my last viewing I looked for the author’s name which was Robert Nathan.  Nathan, born in 1894 and died in 1984 wrote many novels, along works in other genre as we all do, but I feel Portrait of Jennie is exceptional.  I recently purchased to book and found, for the most part, the movie closely followed the book.

If you are a romantic, such as this author even though I write horror and science fiction, watch the movie when you have an opportunity.  And read the book and be mesmerized.

As a side note, I want to mention the enjoyment and importance I find in bringing to light past authors who are forgotten, unknown authors making a contribution to their art but whose name has been lost to time.

 

 

February 19, 2016 at 9:53 pm 2 comments

HAPPY HALLOWEEN

On the eve of this horror holiday, I thought I would offer a zombie treat.

This story was published in the now defunct Blood, Blade, & Thruster in their Winter 2006/2007 issue.  Included in this issue was an interview published with Piers Anthony.  This association caused my writing career to soar.  JUST KIDDING.  I should have saved that for April 1st.  Anyway, I hope you enjoy the story, and if you have a moment during your busy life, LET ME KNOW, my ego would appreciate the response.

THE RELUCTANT ZOMBIE

As Norman stumbled through the dank Haitian swamp, he groaned, “Willard, it feels so unnatural walking around with my arms outstretched, but I can’t seem to put them down.  “I have an image to uphold.”

Willard, who was shuffling along, shook his head and sighed, “Of course it’s unnatural, you’re a zombie, damn it.  And your image is history.”

Norman complained, “I didn’t ask to be a zombie.”  With some difficulty, he swiveled his neck and surveyed the Haitian countryside.

Norman took in the landscape surrounding him.  He walked through a village.  It was nothing more than a few huts of mud and straw along a dusty road.  Chickens pecked in the brush along the roadside.  Chickens!  For some reason their presence made him uncomfortable.  “I really don’t want to be a zombie,” Norman muttered.  He was a forty-year-old college professor, a dark-haired trim man who always dressed well.  Now he was walking around covered in grime and dressed in rags.

Willard said, “If you didn’t want to become a zombie, you shouldn’t have run over the old voodoo woman’s chickens with your jeep.  Was she ever pissed?  She’s also the one that converted me into a zombie, but that’s another story.”

Norman looked at Willard and could not guess what he once looked like.  Willard was pale, gaunt and dressed in rags.  His age made undeterminable by his zombie state.

“As soon as you angered her she began making one of her little dolls.  She cackled while she worked.  That is never a good sign.  The doll is where your soul now resides.”

“I can’t believe this is happening to me, Willard.  I came to Haiti to do research on Haitian religions.  I am, or was, a respected and well-published anthropologist.  Now look at me.  I’m wearing rags and walking around like a…, like a …

“Zombie!” asked Willard

“Just because I ran over a few chickens?”

“Um, Norman, they looked like chickens, but they weren’t.  Nothing around the voodoo woman’s house is what it appears.  They were once her enemies.  She changed them into chickens and you freed them from pecking for insects along the road for the rest of their lives.  You ended their suffering.  So naturally, in her anger, she turned you into a zombie.  I am assigned to train all novice zombies.  To instruct how to attack people teach them what are the best parts to eat.”

Norman made a face at this remark.

“Now what?” asked Willard?

Norman sighed, “I’m a vegetarian.  But I will eat dairy.”

Willard said with disgust, “There are no vegetarian zombies.  And attacking the dairy section of a store is not going to do much for the zombie image.”

Norman grumbled, “Oh, I wouldn’t want to do anything to detract from the zombie image.  Give me a break.”

As the two zombies were arguing, Willard happened to glance over to the voodoo woman’s house.  There she stood in the doorway.  Willard could tell she was not happy.

She hobbled toward Willard and Norman, a waddling mass adorned with bones and beads.  Her crown of thick dreadlocks made her appear as if some multi-legged beast was sitting on her head.

The old voodoo woman shouted at Norman, “I knew you be a trouble maker, with your fancy jeep and running over people’s property.”

Norman mumbled, “Sorry about the chickens.”

“You sorry all right.  You be good and sorry real soon.”

The old woman produced her Norman doll, lifted the doll skyward, and began chanting in a low rumbling voice.

Norman’s soul returned to his body.  He felt like his old self.  He laughed with relief, then glance up.  Willard stumbled toward him, arms raised.

“Willard old buddy, we’re friends – right?”

Willard only growled and roared.

Norman looked desperately for an escape.  On either side of him, zombies with ash-gray complexions staggered in his direction.  He was surrounded.

The old voodoo woman said, “Here be my ‘children’, and they be hungry.”  She cackled as the circle of zombies grew smaller and smaller around Norman.

From beyond the wall of the living dead, Norman pleaded, “Please, make me a chicken!”

THE END

Those that observe ‘Mischief Night, please be kind.

Here are some links where you may purchase my work.

Melange Books

http://www.melange-books.com/authors/walttrizna/index.html

Barnes & Noble.com

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/walt-trizna?store=book&keyword=walt+trizna

 

Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=walt+trizna

October 30, 2015 at 9:12 pm Leave a comment

SUBMITTED: ELMO’S INVENTION

A few days ago, after many rewrites, I finally finished my novella, Elmo’s Invention.  This 16,500 word work is a prequel to my first published Elmo novella, Elmo’s Sojourn, available from Melange Books.

Completing this current novella took quite longer than it should.  Life’s been rough but that’s part of the experience.  But once finished, off it went to Melange Books hopefully with a happy outcome.

Not to give too much away, Elmo’s Invention is the story of a Los Alamos scientist, Elmo, who tinkers in his cellar with ‘off the wall’ ideas that no one would pay him to pursue.  In the course of his tinkering, he invents the perfect prison, but that was not the result he was after.

If this stirs your interest, I’ll let you know if it is published and you interest can be satisfied.

Here are some links where you may purchase my work.

Melange Books

http://www.melange-books.com/authors/walttrizna/index.html

Barnes & Noble.com

http://www.barnesandnoble.com/s/walt-trizna?store=book&keyword=walt+trizna

Amazon.com

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dstripbooks&field-keywords=walt+trizna

September 24, 2015 at 5:41 pm Leave a comment

Older Posts


Calendar

December 2019
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category